education, exercise therapy, informative, pain, research evidence

Recommendations: Top 3 FREE Pain Management Resources

For many of, experiencing pain (and putting up with it!) has been part of our 'lock-down' experience. Whether that's putting up with sore muscles after our training sessions because we can't access our usual sports massage clinic, or tolerating a dodgy toothache due to dental surgery closures. And for some of us, chronic pain has been a feature of our lives for much longer (1). A lot pain management techniques revolve around...

biomechanics, education, informative, research evidence

Biomechanics: ‘Good’ vs. ‘Bad’ Posture Myth

Despite a lack of substantial evidence to support it, there is a continued assumption that pain (particularly lower back pain) is caused by 'poor posture' and specific or repetitive occupational movements...

biomechanics, education, informative, research evidence

Biomechanics: This is why you can’t understand the research articles…

Arguably, when we talk about biomechanics in a clinical sense there is a tendency to use 'qualitative' descriptions of motion, i.e.: planes of motion, ranges of motion. As clinicians or therapists, we describe qualities in a client's movement (i.e.: limited ROM, hyperextension, stiffness, etc). The intended outcome is often to categorise movement as either 'good' or 'bad', and/or to use these to explain a pain or injury. The main aim is for the output to inform our treatment/intervention selection.

informative, research evidence

Four ways to reduce climbing injuries to fingers, elbows and shoulders

Since arriving at Pinnacle Climbing Centre in mid-July I have been learning a lot about climbing injuries. It goes without saying that fingers, forearms and shoulders appear to represent the overwhelming majority of niggles, injuries and mobility issues among these issues. Although I can't be too specific, I would say that around half of those who I have spoken with have told me that they are either currently injured and of these, the majority of these individuals described at least one form of upper extremity injury (fingers, forearms, shoulders, elbows) - with a few neck and upper back issues thrown in for good measure. In fact, most of the folks with lower extremity injuries and pain seem to attribute them to other activities such as running - not climbing.
Now, as science is my specialty let's delve into the research...

Andy Murray wearing KT TAPE
informative

Miracle Injury Cure or Magical Painkiller: What Is Kinesiology Tape – And How Does It Work?

Kinesiology or kinesio tape is an adhesive taping method applied with the aim of reducing pain, increasing range of movement, and/or enhancing quality of movement in response to muskuloskeletal injury. Although originally arising in the 1970s, kinesio taping has rocketed in popularity in recent years, with celebrity endorsements and increasing popularity for both professional and recreational athletes.