biomechanics, education, informative, research evidence

Biomechanics: This is why you can’t understand the research articles…

Arguably, when we talk about biomechanics in a clinical sense there is a tendency to use 'qualitative' descriptions of motion, i.e.: planes of motion, ranges of motion. As clinicians or therapists, we describe qualities in a client's movement (i.e.: limited ROM, hyperextension, stiffness, etc). The intended outcome is often to categorise movement as either 'good' or 'bad', and/or to use these to explain a pain or injury. The main aim is for the output to inform our treatment/intervention selection.

background, Behind the scenes, exercise therapy, group exercise, informative

COVID-19 – Why it’s okay to not be okay

This is not a blog post. It's a letter to you. This is going to be a bit different to my usual content. Normally I might choose an injury or pain-related topic or theme. However, at this moment in time it is impossible not to address the circumstances we are all enduring as a global… Continue reading COVID-19 – Why it’s okay to not be okay

exercise therapy, informative

Three reasons that you’re still in pain…

One of the most common issues I treat in the clinic is persistent pain. Many of my clients arrive at the clinic after years of suffering. This is often a residual pain that started as a result of a traumatic injury... a muscle strain, or a broken bone. However, years after the injury has healed there is no reduction in pain - despite all the injured tissues healing and normal activities are resumed.